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Admiral Insurance Drink and Drugs policy

Depressed Dad

Well-known member
Hi there, I was wondering if you could update me on what the outcome (if any) has been to your situation with Admiral. I am in exactly the same position and would greatly appreciate any advice you might have.

many thanks

adam
No outcome yet. Long drawn out process as I lodged a complaint with the FOS .

Admiral threatening to get their solicitors involved - i.e. court action, if my son doesn't come up with a repayment plan.

Will have to find a way to reduce the amount (all four people with same injury!) and for my son to deal with the debt.

My advice is to get some expert qualified advice. Citizens Advice or a Solicitor.

My advice to anyone reading this is avoid Admiral. Fine if you are teetotal and never, ever have an accident or need to make a claim.
 

ukboxer

Well-known member
My advice to anyone reading this is avoid Admiral. Fine if you are teetotal and never, ever have an accident or need to make a claim.
Perhaps your advice should be to never ever drink drive?

It has nothing to do with being teetotal, having an accident or making a claim.

The problems your son has have been caused by him drink driving (which invalidated his insurance) and causing injuries to others.

Personally I would like to see this 'drink and drugs' clause applied by all insurers. Why should I and others foot the bill??
 

Depressed Dad

Well-known member
Perhaps your advice should be to never ever drink drive?

It has nothing to do with being teetotal, having an accident or making a claim.

The problems your son has have been caused by him drink driving (which invalidated his insurance) and causing injuries to others.

Personally I would like to see this 'drink and drugs' clause applied by all insurers. Why should I and others foot the bill??

I am the first to call my son a fool for drink driving and he has had his punishment through the criminal justice system, which he thoroughly deserves.

What's your DD story. I assume that is what brings you on here.

Perhaps I can help you with your pain?
 

ukboxer

Well-known member
I am the first to call my son a fool for drink driving and he has had his punishment through the criminal justice system, which he thoroughly deserves.

What's your DD story. I assume that is what brings you on here.

Perhaps I can help you with your pain?
I dont have a DD story. I dont drive and drive.
 

ukboxer

Well-known member
I hope your brain works better when you are driving. It doesn't work too well when writing.

I have had a look at your posts on this forum. It's a right riveting read.

BLOCK
LOL obviously I meant I dont drink and DRIVE.

My brain must work as well as yours who incorrectly assumed I am a drink driver :p

Glad you have enjoyed my posts :)
 

ukboxer

Well-known member
I am the first to call my son a fool for drink driving and he has had his punishment through the criminal justice system, which he thoroughly deserves.
Why do you not think your son should also be financially responsible for his actions?

I fail to see why your anger is directed towards an insurance company. Your son agreed to the 'drink and drugs' clause when he signed the contract. If he chooses to break that contract then its his responsibility.

Again I ask you, why should I and others foot the bill for the injuries your son caused?
 

Patrick999

New member
I drink, but I don't (intentionally) drink and drive. I would question any driver, who drinks alcohol, who removes the (intentionally) from that statement. The only way any of us can guarantee we are not over the limit the morning after the night before is to observe a 24 hour abstinance rule. I therefore will not be taking a policy out with Admiral and co.

When we take out insurance we are 'pooling' the risk of an accident. If an insurance company wants to start excluding certain risk factors then (maybe) that is ok, but let's be explicit about it - what illegal (or other) activity is excluded from my policy? Speeding, drink driving, being on the phone etc etc?.

From a purely financial perspective I personally want my insurance to cover me and my co-drivers from the risk that I will make any mistake when driving. If any of those mistakes are criminal then let the Courts deal with that, but I still want the insurance. If the insurance company want to exclude certain risks then give me the option - I will happily pay for complete coverage.

I am totally against drink driving, but I am also a father. I don't think any of my children will drink and drive, but can't give an absolute guarantee that they won't. I am therefore happy to pay for insurance that covers that eventuality. Beating depressed-dad up for a mistake his son made is wrong. He reasonably thought he was insured against this risk, as would have I until I read this.
 

ukboxer

Well-known member
I drink, but I don't (intentionally) drink and drive. I would question any driver, who drinks alcohol, who removes the (intentionally) from that statement. The only way any of us can guarantee we are not over the limit the morning after the night before is to observe a 24 hour abstinance rule. I therefore will not be taking a policy out with Admiral and co.

When we take out insurance we are 'pooling' the risk of an accident. If an insurance company wants to start excluding certain risk factors then (maybe) that is ok, but let's be explicit about it - what illegal (or other) activity is excluded from my policy? Speeding, drink driving, being on the phone etc etc?.

From a purely financial perspective I personally want my insurance to cover me and my co-drivers from the risk that I will make any mistake when driving. If any of those mistakes are criminal then let the Courts deal with that, but I still want the insurance. If the insurance company want to exclude certain risks then give me the option - I will happily pay for complete coverage.

I am totally against drink driving, but I am also a father. I don't think any of my children will drink and drive, but can't give an absolute guarantee that they won't. I am therefore happy to pay for insurance that covers that eventuality. Beating depressed-dad up for a mistake his son made is wrong. He reasonably thought he was insured against this risk, as would have I until I read this.
His son signed a legal contract which included the drink and drugs clause. Its as simple as that.

No one is beating him up, I am simply asking him why I, you and others should pay his sons bill.
 

meercat666

Well-known member
I drink, but I don't (intentionally) drink and drive. I would question any driver, who drinks alcohol, who removes the (intentionally) from that statement. The only way any of us can guarantee we are not over the limit the morning after the night before is to observe a 24 hour abstinance rule. I therefore will not be taking a policy out with Admiral and co.

When we take out insurance we are 'pooling' the risk of an accident. If an insurance company wants to start excluding certain risk factors then (maybe) that is ok, but let's be explicit about it - what illegal (or other) activity is excluded from my policy? Speeding, drink driving, being on the phone etc etc?.

From a purely financial perspective I personally want my insurance to cover me and my co-drivers from the risk that I will make any mistake when driving. If any of those mistakes are criminal then let the Courts deal with that, but I still want the insurance. If the insurance company want to exclude certain risks then give me the option - I will happily pay for complete coverage.

I am totally against drink driving, but I am also a father. I don't think any of my children will drink and drive, but can't give an absolute guarantee that they won't. I am therefore happy to pay for insurance that covers that eventuality. Beating depressed-dad up for a mistake his son made is wrong. He reasonably thought he was insured against this risk, as would have I until I read this.
Welcome to the forums Patrick and what a brilliant 1st post. I agree 100% with all you have said.

Thank you for your views.
 

Patrick999

New member
Welcome to the forums Patrick and what a brilliant 1st post. I agree 100% with all you have said.

Thank you for your views.
Thank you. I stumbled upon this forum by accident (I was reading an article about someone who got an automatic fine from the DVLA for no insurance on a car that he had traded in - apparently the DVLA now cross reference the insurance databases and send out automatic fines!)

Anyway for what it's worth if someone is a habitual drink driver, or is way over the limit, then I have no problem with the book being thrown at them. For someone who makes a one-off mistake then so far as I am concerned a ban / criminal record is enough without crippling them financially too. I will therefore avoid the insurance companies DepressedDad has listed because they sound vindictive to me.

Like I said in my original post I've never been caught drink driving, but I don't think many drivers can honestly say they've never, possibly, driven over the limit following a few drinks the night before. We all make mistakes at the end of the day.

Best of luck to all the people on this forum who have made a one-off mistake. I hope I never have cause to visit here again!!!!
 

Depressed Dad

Well-known member
Thank you. I stumbled upon this forum by accident (I was reading an article about someone who got an automatic fine from the DVLA for no insurance on a car that he had traded in - apparently the DVLA now cross reference the insurance databases and send out automatic fines!)

Anyway for what it's worth if someone is a habitual drink driver, or is way over the limit, then I have no problem with the book being thrown at them. For someone who makes a one-off mistake then so far as I am concerned a ban / criminal record is enough without crippling them financially too. I will therefore avoid the insurance companies DepressedDad has listed because they sound vindictive to me.

Like I said in my original post I've never been caught drink driving, but I don't think many drivers can honestly say they've never, possibly, driven over the limit following a few drinks the night before. We all make mistakes at the end of the day.

Best of luck to all the people on this forum who have made a one-off mistake. I hope I never have cause to visit here again!!!!
Thanks Patrick, a rare, compassionate voice of reason.
 

Stanley 750

New member
I've been following this thread with interest hoping to see some good news for Depressed Dad. Am in similar situation having been in an accident about a year ago where I was breathalysed and over limit. My Insurers (Tradewise) have finally contacted me telling me they have settled Third Party claims and plan to seek reimbursement from me, stating that I have 14 days to reply to them, otherwise they will issue legal proceedings against me. Have spent a lot of time trying to find a solicitor who has experience of defending a client successfully in this situation but so far no luck. Any recommendations most welcome!
 

lasvegas

New member
I wonder if drink driving is one of the most common yet least prosecuted offences, ratio wise, in this country. I for one have been enlightened and somewhat horrified to find out how slowly alcohol passes through our system. Until about six months ago I was one of the naive majority (or at least sizeable minority) who if questioned would have said a good nights sleep would probably render you safe to drive. Indeed I have to admit I didn't consciously think 'I'm sure I'm OK to drive', I didn't think about it full stop. Drink Driving to me was the person who had a few in the pub and then climbed straight into his vehicle. I'm sure at some point in my life I must have read stories about drivers who failed breathalysers as late as the next afternoon, but my memory had obviously chosen to erase them.

So sadly, after reading about the slow breakdown of alcohol in the body, I realise I've been a drunk driver and I also know a fair few people around me have committed the self same offence. I worked in an occupation that required a pre 6am start and there's no way that all those who had a good drink up until 11pm the night before were clear by 5.30am. And many of these 'party animals' actually drove as part of their job description.

Shocked though I am to discover I'm not quite the driver I believed myself to be, I'm even more rudely awakened to the realisation I could have quite conceivably lost everything through my ignorance. The roads are quiet at 5.30am in these parts, perversely that makes them just as dangerous and I've seen drivers emerge from junctions without slowing, pedestrians stepping out without checking, all the silly things people do when complacency and bad habits set in during these quiet periods. So the roads are potentially dangerous at any time and had I been involved in a serious accident, contributory negligence by the injured party being by the by if I was found to be over the limit, I shudder at the possible outcome.

I didn't know I was driving over the limit ...... STUPID. I didn't know my policy might contain an exemption .............. STUPID. And I wonder how many thousands of drivers up and down the country are dicing with their very future, blissfully ignorant on both counts. I've been driving for thirty years and haven't had any points. I try to leave enough time for my journey, I don't tailgate and I'm happy within most speed limits except the accursed 20mph. So what, if I was caught for a brake light being defective and found to be over-the-limit, I'm a criminal, no argument and no excuse listened to. How easy all your good work (good luck) can be undone.

So I do sympathise with those finding themselves in this horrible predicament. It'd be a bit holier-than-thou if I didn't. The point made by those that if a family member was killed by a next-day drunk driver you'd want him punished severely is valid. How can you disagree with them. It's not a game is it, it's literally life-and-death. But I wonder if they agree with me that the drink drive awareness campaigns maybe should focus a bit more on how easy it is to go over-the-limit and have your driving skills impaired. And what the consequences may be way beyond a ban and a fine. All this belief that two pints are OK and you're fine after 8 hours sleep needs to be comprehensively shattered. Personal responsibility is the order of the day. But it's in EVERYONES interests that our roads are made as safe as possible. I thought I was a reasonably educated person and as I say a considerate and conscientous driver. What I actually was was a naive fool who needed a wake-up call. I can only say a huge THANK YOU to this site.
 

Ravinaldo

Member
A year and a half has passed since my accident and I'm pleased to say I was acquitted at trial.

My advice would be to fight it all the way if you had any form of a defence, that's before accepting a dd charge in these circumstances. The cost of my claim would have crippled me, it amounted to approx £150k.

My case was a genuine example of someone that could've been wrongly convicted and hit with recovery action against them unjustly.
 

uklegendman

Well-known member
Just been reading these posts, its beyond me that people are blaming the insurance companies for not paying out when they were caught drink driving!.

Its simple, if you sign up to the policy, you abide by the terms of the agreement.

Its there in black and white!.

Someone was even using the argument that most people don't read the small print and just expect to be covered!.


I've been caught drink driving and paying the consequences, if another party was involved I would have to pay the bill, as when taking out the policy I legally agreed to the terms and conditions.

Fair enough people want a break down of the invoices to check its all above board, and even try to negotiate for a smaller bill but the bottom line is you have no get out once you agree to the conditions on the policy.

Rant over, breath out. . .
 

Depressed Dad

Well-known member
Just been reading these posts, its beyond me that people are blaming the insurance companies for not paying out when they were caught drink driving!.

Its simple, if you sign up to the policy, you abide by the terms of the agreement.

Its there in black and white!.

Someone was even using the argument that most people don't read the small print and just expect to be covered!.


I've been caught drink driving and paying the consequences, if another party was involved I would have to pay the bill, as when taking out the policy I legally agreed to the terms and conditions.

Fair enough people want a break down of the invoices to check its all above board, and even try to negotiate for a smaller bill but the bottom line is you have no get out once you agree to the conditions on the policy.

Rant over, breath out. . .
Who were you insured with?
 
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