TV Programme - Time

Convicted Driver Insurance

Shoegal

Well-known member
Did anyone else watch this with Sean Bean? I saw it last week and it really hit home and terrified me at the same time. Was a difficult watch but very powerful I thought. Made me even more grateful that it was a kerb I hit and not a person. 🙈😥
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
Did anyone else watch this with Sean Bean? I saw it last week and it really hit home and terrified me at the same time. Was a difficult watch but very powerful I thought. Made me even more grateful that it was a kerb I hit and not a person. 🙈😥
It is incredibly realistic.

I worked in the Prison Service for 16 years (building them,) but came into contact with lot's of officers and prisoners.

There was one scene that struck me where a prisoner was talking to his mum in the visits and said he was appealing the sentence but not the conviction for murder as there was only a single stab wound.

I had exactly the same conversation with a prisoner. He seemed to accept his guilt but wanted a reduced sentence. Plus he did not seem too remorseful.
 

Reets

Well-known member
It was an amazing production. Amazing performances.

Really captured how a split second decision - the incorrect decision - will have lifelong consequences.
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
It was an amazing production. Amazing performances.

Really captured how a split second decision - the incorrect decision - will have lifelong consequences.
Roots.

The most realistic thing about the first episode is that you are very much under the control of someone else and have to operate to their timetable.

I found this out the hard way during my 3 night stay in Police cells when I was caught the firsts time.

Floor was cold. No slippers allowed, just socks so feet were freezing. No belt, so trousers were constantly falling down. Thin, grubby if not downright dirty foam latex 'mattress' on a concrete plinth as a bed with an equally grubby sheet to keep warm, and no pillow. Having to ask for loo roll every time you went to the toilet (at least the two I stayed in had in-cell sanitation.) No soap so only given a few wet wipes for your hands. Never taken out of the cell unless it was to speak with a doctor. Horrible, microwaved food that was as scorching as napalm, eaten with a plastic fork. The only thing on regular supply was tea and coffee.

Officers on duty were with one exception, judgemental and condescending.

The other 'frequent flyers,' were loud, obnoxious, spoke with each other at aircraft engine decibel level.

When I asked the one female officer that was even partially sympathetic how they got through it she simply said 'Sleep.' No much hope of that with all the noise.

After 3 nights of this I was willing to taken any punishment dished out just to get it over with.

In saying that, the cold shoulder and sleeping in the spare bed at home for 6 weeks after weren't much better.

But did I learn my lesson?

Yeh, right.

I was caught again in July 2019.

That was when I reached rock bottom and finally did something about my alcohol consumption.

I joined AA and haven't had a drink in nearly 2 years.

Despite all that, when I was in the holding cell at the Sherriff Court waiting on my trial to start, I got talking to a lot of the other inmates and actually got on fairly well with them. Probably because most of them grew up in the same working class streets that I had years before.
 
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Shoegal

Well-known member
I really identify with what Luna is saying - how you did three nights I’ll never know! 14 hrs was hard enough. Like you, I had no chance of sleeping either. It was so loud and stressful in there and I literally felt like pulling my hair out. I have never wanted the comfort and safety of my own bedroom so much. The lack of freedom to just get up, switch the kettle on etc was overwhelming. Further degradation by having to ask for sanitary products etc was really grim. I can’t imagine what facing years and years of that must be like. Not to mention the hierarchy/politics in place in prison where you need to do ‘favours’ for inmates in order to survive.
Makes me shudder just thinking about it. X
 

Reets

Well-known member
Same here I arrived around 12:45, took about 45m to check me in. I slept as much as I could but my ex-h was due to drop the kids off around 07:30 so needed to arrange something. Worst hangover ever - probably.
There was a lot of commotion all night. They would check you every half hour so wake you up. I was extremely fortunate for how I was treated. They kept me informed and the lady cop who took over the following morning was exceptionally good to me.

Safe to say it was and is the worst period of my life nearly 2 years ago.

With all my ‘good’ intentions of giving my friend a lift home - life changing decision… Possibly if I hadn’t clipped my car and smashed into the central reservation I too could have taken someone’s life.

I have certainly learned my lesson. IF I get my license back I will never go near a car with a drop of alcohol again and I will never get in a car with someone who has had a drink.
 
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Luna2000

Well-known member
I really identify with what Luna is saying - how you did three nights I’ll never know! 14 hrs was hard enough. Like you, I had no chance of sleeping either. It was so loud and stressful in there and I literally felt like pulling my hair out. I have never wanted the comfort and safety of my own bedroom so much. The lack of freedom to just get up, switch the kettle on etc was overwhelming. Further degradation by having to ask for sanitary products etc was really grim. I can’t imagine what facing years and years of that must be like. Not to mention the hierarchy/politics in place in prison where you need to do ‘favours’ for inmates in order to survive.
Makes me shudder just thinking about it. X
You are actually treated much better in prison than in Police custody, despite the fact you are still technically innocent of any crime.

Most prison now have in cell sanitation and showers in a small enclosed cubicle, and all your sanitary products are in your cell with you.

Yes, you still get banged up at night and you can be locked down at a moments notice, but it is actually better than police custody.
 
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