Loneliness after conviction

Convicted Driver Insurance

Jo88

Well-known member
If you are involved in an accident where damage or injury is caused then you must stop, and give your name and address to anyone who has the need for them. In the case of personal injury then you must give your insurance details.
If you are unable to do this then you must report the accident to the police asap, and in any case within 24 hours. (Reporting it later because it suits you does not absolve your duty to stop and give your name and address)
Due care and attention is harder to define, but amounts to your driving falling below the standards required of a reasonable driver, resulting in an accident or inconvenience to other road users.
Oh, I see. I have not had an accident :(
 

price1367

TTC Group
Oh, I see. I have not had an accident :(
I was just telling you what ‘failing to stop’ is. Of course you cannot be charged with failing to stop if there was no requirement to stop, but you can be found guilty of driving without due care and attention, or driving without reasonable consideration for other road users without being involved in an accident.
I can remember someone being convicted of driving without reasonable consideration for other road users when they drove through a large puddle (that they could have easily avoided) and soaking some pedestrians.
 
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Hayesy

Member
I was just telling you what ‘failing to stop’ is. Of course you cannot be charged with failing to stop if there was no requirement to stop, but you can be found guilty of driving without due care and attention, or driving without reasonable consideration for other road users without being involved in an accident.
I can remember someone being convicted of driving without reasonable consideration for other road users when they drove through a large puddle (that they could have easily avoided) and soaking some
Fail to stop is actually about failing to stop for a constable. It's certainly the offence that I was convicted of and made mine an aggravated offence.
 
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price1367

TTC Group
Fail to stop is actually about failing to stop for a constable. It's certainly the offence that I was convicted of and made mine an aggravated offence.
Yes, you can also be prosecuted for ‘failing to stop’ when directed to do so by a Constable in uniform as well as the requirement to stop after a road traffic collision.
 

simondo72

Active member
Hiya,

I completely understand what you’re saying and agree with you. There’s a clear level of hypocrisy looking at the situation. The reality is I had only just the day before started learning how to handcuff people. The aggravation was used in a gross misconduct hearing and not in the court room, I should have made that more clear. In response to another comment my breath reading was 77, end my ban is 17 months with a reduction from the course.

I’m in a much better place since writing this and appreciate the comments. All of them are constructive which is a great advocate for using this page. Wish everyone all the best.
Glad you are feeling more positive, as you should do. Make sure to book the course early (I didn’t and completed it on the last day allowable) and my 17 months got reduced to 13 months and 1 day. You will learn a lot from the course and will meet some interesting people. Onwards and upwards!
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
I’m not a career advisor in anyway but there is nothing to stop you going to university and gaining a degree at any stage in your life or doing courses to develop your skills in other areas. Who knows what seems like closed doors just now might open back up in the future.

I’ve just got over the realisation that I won’t be able to go to Canada for 10 years. Ive never wanted to go to Canada but it seems worse when someone tells you that you can’t. A bit like banned for driving.

Give it time and re-evaluate. You are young and have a full life ahead of you.
Funnily(?) enough, I was at an AA meeting today and someone was speaking about being on holiday in Canada a number of times but before this he had mentioned the fact that even as little as 5 years ago, he been convicted of a crime he committed and had served time in prison (he had also served othr spells over the years.)

Anyway, I have 2 DUI's and as they are both criminal convictions, I asked him how he managed to get to Canada with his much longer and varied list.

He seemed surprised by the question and basically said that if you don't tell them anything on you Visa application form as they do not have access to any UK criminal records systems.

Now I am not advocating this is the way to go, but????
 

grice96

Well-known member
Funnily(?) enough, I was at an AA meeting today and someone was speaking about being on holiday in Canada a number of times but before this he had mentioned the fact that even as little as 5 years ago, he been convicted of a crime he committed and had served time in prison (he had also served othr spells over the years.)

Anyway, I have 2 DUI's and as they are both criminal convictions, I asked him how he managed to get to Canada with his much longer and varied list.

He seemed surprised by the question and basically said that if you don't tell them anything on you Visa application form as they do not have access to any UK criminal records systems.

Now I am not advocating this is the way to go, but????

Not all crimes bar you from Canada. Murder, Rape, Fraud and DUI however, do. Canada also do have access to the database should you be selected for scrutiny.What crime did this person at AA do jail time for?

This would be a very expensive mistake to make which would result in you being put on the first flight back to where you came from if you are found out.
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
Not all crimes bar you from Canada. Murder, Rape, Fraud and DUI however, do. Canada also do have access to the database should you be selected for scrutiny.What crime did this person at AA do jail time for?

This would be a very expensive mistake to make which would result in you being put on the first flight back to where you came from if you are found out.
Not sure what crime he committed, but he has had multiple jail sentences in the past. I agree that you would need to be prepared to be knocked back if you chance your arm.

A DUI expires after 10 years. It's a felony in Canada and a Misdemeanour in the USA which is why you can normally travel to the US without any issues.

The ESTA (ETA) for Canada asks you for ANY criminal convictions, whereas the USA ask for moral turpitude and crimes where damage to property or people happened.
 

DD123456

Well-known member
Would the US class crashing into a wooden lamppost as “serious damage to property”? It was only slightly dented and did not need replacing. My court documents don’t mention me crashing either.
 

price1367

TTC Group
Would the US class crashing into a wooden lamppost as “serious damage to property”? It was only slightly dented and did not need replacing. My court documents don’t mention me crashing either.
Certainly not….. ‘serious damage’ would be in the many thousands of pounds.
 

Sundog

Member
I still feel bad after over 3 years since the conviction. I’ve lost a great job and am lucky to still have another one (which is harder work for less pay), endured relationship difficulties, have some family who still don’t even speak to me, and even have a failed overdose or two to my name.

It’s been an awful 3+ years, but somehow you just have to get through it. Just glad that I’ve kicked the bottle a long time ago, because it didn’t half make those dark moments darker.

I could write a book on what I’ve been through this last few years, and it pretty much all started with drinking too much. I do still wish I could go back somehow and scream at myself not to get in the car that day.
 

C J 1980

Well-known member
I think all of us on here go through the motions and loneliness of the conviction during the early stages.

Time does help to mend the experience and help us all move forward with our lives. Using this site was a massive help for me in 2019/20 when I was banned.

CJ
 

Polly3

Well-known member
I still feel bad after over 3 years since the conviction. I’ve lost a great job and am lucky to still have another one (which is harder work for less pay), endured relationship difficulties, have some family who still don’t even speak to me, and even have a failed overdose or two to my name.

It’s been an awful 3+ years, but somehow you just have to get through it. Just glad that I’ve kicked the bottle a long time ago, because it didn’t half make those dark moments darker.

I could write a book on what I’ve been through this last few years, and it pretty much all started with drinking too much. I do still wish I could go back somehow and scream at myself not to get in the car that day.
Perhaps focus , if you can , on what you’ve achieved, rather than your mistakes. Give yourself credit .
 

Sundog

Member
Perhaps focus , if you can , on what you’ve achieved, rather than your mistakes. Give yourself credit .
Thanks, Polly.

I still am doing OK, but the remorse over this and other woes still gets me down to this day. It’s difficult, because my woes didn’t end just with the DD conviction. My relationship issues got so bad, that just when I thought my reputation couldn’t get any worse, it did!

On the plus side, I do still have a good job and I’ve never been in physically better shape. Mentally however it’s a different story. If not for my kids, I’m not sure I’d be typing this now. But what choice do we have but to carry on? 🙂
 
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