Involved in a bad crash. Blew twice over

Spooner16

New member
Due in Court soon. I had 4 beers throughout the afternoon. I was in my car and I am in deep regret with everything. I intended to go for some lunch and a pint.
Ill keep it brief- I was in the single occupancy lane on a local main road. My lane was clear ahead then a car pulled out from the 2-plus lane into the lane I was in. I slammed the brakes on and I abruptly veered right so too not smash into the rear of the car- Resulting in me seriously smashing my car to bits, writing it off and hitting the other car and wrecking the lampost I hit and it all caused so much disruption to everyone. The other driver was un-injured thankfully and I wish I had the opportunity to speak to them i really do. I wish I had a dash-cam fitted. Ive hurt myself quite badly but ive not bothered about my injuries due to being over the limit, so not chasing a claim. I climbed out of my car and the police where there instantly, I never got to see who was in the other car or have a look at anything.I got Put in the police car, blew twice over. Ive a brilliant job and flat I could lose if I am sent down. Ive
Previous DR10 14 years ago.
Ive got a history of mental health issues which have been addressed and flare-up. Ive alot going on with contact issues with my child and ive hit the drink alot recently. Ive recently contacted people/help agencies to steer me from the beer and help me.
Anyone have any advice for me regarding my situation and what could possibly be the outcome of it all..? I just want to gain contact with the other person involved as I want to see if their handling everything ok
Thank you

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Forum Moderator

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You say you blew twice the limit so presuming you committed the offence in England and Wales where the legal limit is 35 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath, twice the limit would equate to 70 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath.

Magistrates refer to sentencing guidelines when sentencing drink drivers. Sentencing guidelines suggest that anyone convicted of driving with excess alcohol with a breath reading anywhere between 60 - 89 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath should be subject to a driving disqualification between 17 and 22 months and a band c fine or low level community order.

If your previous drink driving conviction was within the last 10 years, you would have faced a mandatory minimum 3 year disqualification. Magistrates will be aware of your previous conviction, however it wont trigger the 3 year minimum and will likely be classed as a slight aggravating factor.

Magistrates can deviate from guidelines where there are serious aggravating factors such being involved in a bad collision and/or causing injury to others.

The fact you were involved in a RTC will be an aggravating factor which could see the magistrates consider sentencing you in line with the next sentencing bracket which suggests a 23-28 month disqualification and a low to high level community order.

Custody is only considered in the most serious of cases. Sentencing guidelines suggest custody should be considered in cases where the level of alcohol in a persons breath is between 120 and 150 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath or when the offence is so serious that neither a fine or a community sentence alone would be justified.
 
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