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HRO'S are in the same category as murderers etc,?

peter_m

Member
Have to agree and don't see why people are surprised....If you drink drive then that is premeditated and if you kill someone while doing it, it surely has to be premeditated murder, even though it is not treated as such?

You, essentially, have a 2 ton piece of killing machine under your right foot.
 

grice96

Well-known member
Why would it not be? We commited a pre-meditated crime that could have killed a group of people. We were just lucky that we did not, I have not issue with being in the HRO category. I did do the crime after all.
 

price1367

TTC Group
I don’t know where the quote came from but it is completely wrong.
it is not the police or court that label you as a High Risk Offender. The licensing system puts that label on you which then starts the requirement for a medical before you can get your licence back.
YOU only get the HRO status if you have a reading more than 2.5 times the legal limit or fail to supply a sample that you are legally obliged to supply. Otherwise you have to commit 2 drink driving offences in 10 years. ALL people in the above categories are HRO, not at ‘high risk of being labelled as such)
If you have done any of these things, why should you not have to have a medical to prove that you are fit to drive?
Also there is (at present) not such thing as HRO for drug offences, that is still being considered after the big increase in the number of drug driving convictions.
As to it being a “recent change in the law” ... the HRO scheme was introduced into law in 1983, 37 years hardly recent!

YOU do not show up on any DBS or other police check as a HRO, you show up as having a conviction for drink driving. That is regardless of if you are HRO or not. The check also show convictions for thefts, assaults, drug possession and yes, murder and sex offences.
 

price1367

TTC Group
Getinnowhere, Shockingly, I have just googled the telephone number on your post about HRO’s and it comes from MAJ Law “specialist motoring solicitors”. A shining example of why no one should use them! They go on to set out what makes you a HRO, then says your own GP MAY not be able to do the DVLA medical ( They CANNOT do the DVLA HRO medicals) some misspellings, then say that if you drive whilst waiting to for the result of the medical and your ban is up, you are still disqualified and can be sent to prison (you are NOT banned when your ban is up, you would be guilty of driving without a licence and cannot go to prison for that)

They also say you are HRO if you blow 87.5. That is like saying you are speeding if you are doing 30 in a 30. The HRO is if you blow MORE than 2.5 times the legal limit, which is 87.5, so the reading has to be 88 or more to be HRO (apart from the fact that the breath test machines only show full numbers anyway)
Than might seem a bit pedantic, but as they splash all over their website how they find inaccuracies in the prosecution case and how the police do not stick to procedure, surely it would be reasonable to expect them to give accurate advice on their website?

They say:
Get Advice from the Experts
M.A.J. Law’s team of expert motoring defence solicitors are always on hand to discuss your case and provide advice.
We offer a free initial consultation service, so why not take advantage?

i will leave it to you to decide if they have the capability to offer “expert advice”.....

 
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price1367

TTC Group
You were conned' Magistrates tell drug driver who paid specialist motoring solicitors


although to be accurate and balancing matters, a further report says that the magistrate was reprimanded for using those words. (but not for lying) £6000 down the drain and it was the clients fault for not paying more (and it hadn’t even got to trial)
 

neebob200

Well-known member
You were conned' Magistrates tell drug driver who paid specialist motoring solicitors


although to be accurate and balancing matters, a further report says that the magistrate was reprimanded for using those words. (but not for lying) £6000 down the drain and it was the clients fault for not paying more (and it hadn’t even got to trial)
Hi pricey am glad you brought theses cowboys to are attention.i used these people for my drug driving offense last year and what a compleate waste of 7000 pounds but I was desperate.They are pure con artists who know your are desperate and will rope you in and will hang you out to dry.all along I was told I had a good chance in my case,and when court day arrived I was told best plead guilty.BEWARE ALL.
 

price1367

TTC Group
I have emailed M.A.J. Law to point out that their HRO advice is very flawed, but not said why. As specialists I presume that they will be able to read it again and see where the mistakes are....... I will check for a new version soon but not hold my breath.....
 

neebob200

Well-known member
I have emailed M.A.J. Law to point out that their HRO advice is very flawed, but not said why. As specialists I presume that they will be able to read it again and see where the mistakes are....... I will check for a new version soon but not hold my breath.....
Licence issued today only took 5 days from the key worker dvla post code and no medical for a dg10 conviction. Lesson learned the hard way.
 

C J 1980

Well-known member
There seems to be a massive misconception about this.

The Police and the Probation Service do use a term known as HRO and this is for what I would describe as active criminals who commit burglary and theft offences.

The Probation also use it for criminals on licence who may have been convicted of serious offences. Like you said murderers can be released on licence (sometimes for life) and be classed as a HRO because they were convicted of the most serious of offences.

The Police also use the HRO term for domestic violence offences whereby they get repeated offenders who maybe subject one partner to DV then move on to another relationship and do the same to the new partner.

These types of HROs I am referring to are criminals in the 'system' who the Police/Probation/other law bodies have identified as being kind of like a person of interest (if that is an appropriate phrase).

The DVLA also use the term HRO but this is for category purposes. This depends on three things -

a) Refusing to provide.
b) Already having been convicted of drink driving previously in ten years.
c) Having a high reading over 87.5.

Unfortunately, I fell into the last category making me a DVLA HRO. I am still a convicted criminal with a recordable conviction but this is my one and only offence against my name.

CJ
 
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Forum Moderator

Staff member
"Until recently, the term ‘high risk offender’ only applied to sex offenders, murderers and those who commit very serious crimes.


Due to changes in the law, the courts, police and prosecution service may now regard an offender as ‘high risk’ if they are convicted of a drink driving offence.
"

This is also incorrect as the high risk offender scheme was introduced in 1983 (37 years ago).
 

price1367

TTC Group
No, the law is correct, it is incorrect when they claim it is a recent change in the law, it was introduced 37 years ago, and they should know that as a law firm.
 

C J 1980

Well-known member
This is actually quite appalling and a little bit insulting. I am a convicted drink driver in the HRO category, because my reading was very high on my arrest. To date this is my only brush with the law and I intend to keep it that way until the day I pop my clogs.

To be put me in the same league as a murderer or a sex offender is madness. Many of these people have been convicted of the worst or most unpleasant crimes in society. Many remain in prison for life, others are subjected to life time licences if they are released & most have to declare their convictions forever as they are never classed as 'spent'.

I am not defending my own actions - drink driving is criminal & a recordable crime. However, as I said in my previous post the term 'High Risk Offender' drink driving is NOT the same as a High Risk Offender released from prison for a very serious offence. They are simply identical terms used by different organisations.

The DVLA maybe should consider reviewing the term HRO and use another phrase so as not to confuse convicted drivers in this way. 'Category High Offender' might be an appropriate term because it still uses the words 'High' and 'Offender' but we would be known as CHO' s which is easy enough to remember.

If this legal company is advertising misleading information like this -surely they can be reported to such organisations as the Law Society or even Trading Standards.

CJ
 

price1367

TTC Group
I think you would be better off suggesting to the probation service that they alter their wording if you feel there is confusion.....
They have low medium high and very high categories for the risk that offenders pose. The High Risk Offender scheme for drink driving was in place in law well before probation came up with their descriptions, but those are not enshrined in law.
The LEGAL definition of a High Risk Offender is in the wording of:
The Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) Regulations 1999


so a change in law would be needed to reword drink drive HRO, probation could just decide to use a different descriptor?

The real issue it the solicitors website making it seem that the two HRO terms are the same, whereas they are not.

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