Advice Needed on Expected Punishment

Convicted Driver Insurance

stu12341234

Well-known member
Hi,

I hope you are doing well, your friend will be out soon! I know someone from years ago stated "I would rather spend 1 week in prison than 48hrs in the police station cells". (Never been to prison but 12hrs in the cell was awful).
As stated before atleast no one was hurt because the 18 weeks could have been exchanged into years.

Your obviously a great friend, Keep it up!

Kind regards,




Stu
 

firemansam007

Well-known member
Sam

Hopefully with the 8 week sentence, he should be released in time for Christmas.

It would be in order for me to say that he needs to forget about driving again for a long long time. One step at a time, but I would think he will have a lot of bridges to cross before he can even consider driving again.

If anything does come out of all this, is that at least no one else has come to any harm and he won't have someone else's misery weighing on his consious.

Maybe the experience of a short prison sentence will be enough of a 'jolt' for your friend to make some positive changes to his life when he is released.

CJ
Thanks CJ. i know he faces an uphill task in getting his license back. he have to wait for 4 years now.

agree he should learn from this but don't know.
 

firemansam007

Well-known member
Thanks CJ. i know he faces an uphill task in getting his license back. he have to wait for 4 years now.

agree he should learn from this but don't know.
Dear all,

Just to let you know my friend is well settled into the prison. :cool: he's very happy. He have received a letter with few dates on it. Can someone please advise what does they mean

1) Conditional release - 05-Dec-21
2) ERSD ( i googled and found it's Early Release Scheme Date - 22-Nov-21
3) License expiry - 02-Jan-22
4) Top up supervision - 05-Dec-22

Thanks for all your help and advise.

Thanks,

Sam
 

firemansam007

Well-known member
Dear all,

Just to let you know my friend is well settled into the prison. :cool: he's very happy. He have received a letter with few dates on it. Can someone please advise what does they mean

1) Conditional release - 05-Dec-21
2) ERSD ( i googled and found it's Early Release Scheme Date - 22-Nov-21
3) License expiry - 02-Jan-22
4) Top up supervision - 05-Dec-22

Thanks for all your help and advise.

Thanks,

Sam
Please can someone respond to this post.

@price1367 kindly advise. Thanks for your help.
 

price1367

TTC Group
Dear all,

Just to let you know my friend is well settled into the prison. :cool: he's very happy. He have received a letter with few dates on it. Can someone please advise what does they mean

1) Conditional release - 05-Dec-21
2) ERSD ( i googled and found it's Early Release Scheme Date - 22-Nov-21
3) License expiry - 02-Jan-22
4) Top up supervision - 05-Dec-22

Thanks for all your help and advise.

Thanks,

Sam
1. That is the date he will be released, if well behaved
2. I don’t think that applies, it was a scheme used during Covid restrictions to let people out even earlier but stopped last August
3. That is the date up until which he could be recalled to prison if he got into further bother, so best be favour until then!
That is a date for the final meeting with a probation officer to “sign him off”

hope that helps…
 

firemansam007

Well-known member
1. That is the date he will be released, if well behaved
2. I don’t think that applies, it was a scheme used during Covid restrictions to let people out even earlier but stopped last August
3. That is the date up until which he could be recalled to prison if he got into further bother, so best be favour until then!
That is a date for the final meeting with a probation officer to “sign him off”

hope that helps…
Many thanks Price. a real 🌟🌟of this group
 

C J 1980

Well-known member
Please can someone respond to this post.

@price1367 kindly advise. Thanks for your help.

Sam

I appreciate Price has already replied.

The post prison licence will probably be an electronic tag that your friend will be monitored by for a four week period. I am assuming he will be on a home detention curfew to remain indoors between 7pm and 7am.

I suppose four weeks isn't a hardship, but obviously the Christmas period will limit his socialising, unless people visit him at home. It might be a good thing, if say he is struggling with alcohol to keep him away from licenced premises in the evening.

Post the licence period much of 2022 will be simply taking part in probation service appointments. Sometimes, the offenders have to attend the probation offices in person, but probation staff can conduct home visits.

At least he will be out in just under three weeks which is good.

CJ
 

firemansam007

Well-known member
Sam

I appreciate Price has already replied.

The post prison licence will probably be an electronic tag that your friend will be monitored by for a four week period. I am assuming he will be on a home detention curfew to remain indoors between 7pm and 7am.

I suppose four weeks isn't a hardship, but obviously the Christmas period will limit his socialising, unless people visit him at home. It might be a good thing, if say he is struggling with alcohol to keep him away from licenced premises in the evening.

Post the licence period much of 2022 will be simply taking part in probation service appointments. Sometimes, the offenders have to attend the probation offices in person, but probation staff can conduct home visits.

At least he will be out in just under three weeks which is good.

CJ
Thanks CJ. I am assuming he should be alright with the home detention. My only prayer is he learns his lesson and doesn't drink/drive or drive while disqualified. I know i's long ban for him, but that's the reality.
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
Hi,

I hope you are doing well, your friend will be out soon! I know someone from years ago stated "I would rather spend 1 week in prison than 48hrs in the police station cells". (Never been to prison but 12hrs in the cell was awful).
As stated before atleast no one was hurt because the 18 weeks could have been exchanged into years.

Your obviously a great friend, Keep it up!

Kind regards,




Stu
I agree.

I was arrested on a Friday evening (evidential reading of 124,) and spent Friday, Saturday and Sunday in police custody, no Idea why as I didn't crash or injure anyone.. Basically you are on 24 hour lockup in police custody. No opportunity to wash, have a shower, brush your teeth etc. On the Saturday I was moved form a 'modern holding facility' to an older one where you had to ask for loo role to use the toilet, ask for hand wipes when you were finished as there was no whb in the cell and had to ask the the custody officer to flush your toilet for you. The mattresses were to be honest 'boggin' and uncomfortable and the less said about the single blanket the better.

I have extensive experience of the prison system (not as a guest,) and can guarantee there would be a riot if prisons were run under these conditions.
 

C J 1980

Well-known member
I agree.

I was arrested on a Friday evening (evidential reading of 124,) and spent Friday, Saturday and Sunday in police custody, no Idea why as I didn't crash or injure anyone.. Basically you are on 24 hour lockup in police custody. No opportunity to wash, have a shower, brush your teeth etc. On the Saturday I was moved form a 'modern holding facility' to an older one where you had to ask for loo role to use the toilet, ask for hand wipes when you were finished as there was no whb in the cell and had to ask the the custody officer to flush your toilet for you. The mattresses were to be honest 'boggin' and uncomfortable and the less said about the single blanket the better.

I have extensive experience of the prison system (not as a guest,) and can guarantee there would be a riot if prisons were run under these conditions.

Luna

I am really sorry to hear about your experience in police custody. Under the Police & Criminal Evidence Act 1984, Custody Sergeants can only detain people for a maximum of up to 24 hours before they either charge or release you.

Once charged, custody sergeant's can technically 'remand' prisoners in police custody to appear before the next available court session. If you are charged at lunchtime on a Saturday and the sergeant refuses bail, you can invariably spend just shy of 48 hours in police custody until you are taken to the Magistrates Court on Monday morning.

On reflection, maybe I was fortunate - I was arrested late afternoon for DUI. Because the coppers hadn't witness me drive, I had to be interviewed. As I was well oiled, they cannot interview people until they have sobered up, so I wasn't interviewed until the following morning in custody.

I coughed on interview and was swiftly charged and released just before lunchtime. I believe I was in police custody for around 19-20 hours in total. It isn't an experience I would like to relive again. The worst part was 'drying' out from a five day alcohol binge. They did get the custody nurse to check me over, but I was in a right old state and I was climbing the walls in my cell because the anxiety and withdrawal was kicking in.

When I took part in my drink drive reduction course, I heard some right horror stories of how people were treated by the police - and in my view the people on my course were all decent folk who had never been in trouble previously with the coppers.

CJ
 

Gilln1

Well-known member
I agree.

I was arrested on a Friday evening (evidential reading of 124,) and spent Friday, Saturday and Sunday in police custody, no Idea why as I didn't crash or injure anyone.. Basically you are on 24 hour lockup in police custody. No opportunity to wash, have a shower, brush your teeth etc. On the Saturday I was moved form a 'modern holding facility' to an older one where you had to ask for loo role to use the toilet, ask for hand wipes when you were finished as there was no whb in the cell and had to ask the the custody officer to flush your toilet for you. The mattresses were to be honest 'boggin' and uncomfortable and the less said about the single blanket the better.

I have extensive experience of the prison system (not as a guest,) and can guarantee there would be a riot if prisons were run under these conditions.
That sounds an awful experience Luna2000.

The cell door closed on me at about 0400 Sunday morning after blowing 76 and I did around 10 hours in custody. I was coherent throughout and slept for a couple of hours on the slab of concrete with that thin mattress and blanket. When they unlocked the door at maybe around 0930 to take me to have my prints and picture taken it was actually a relief just to not be in that small cold blank room.

When they took me back to the cell and the guy said it "shouldn't be much longer" before I am released, in the whole scheme of things he was right I suppose, but I remember pacing up and down and starting to feel claustrophobic, anxious etc etc. Those last 2 or 3 hours were terrible, so having to do Friday through to Sunday like you did...... you have my sympathy as I'm not sure how I would of dealt with that and I am generally speaking a pretty strong willed bloke.

Don't get me wrong, I was over the limit, guilty, so was in a process, but that short period was horrible. I have to say though all things considered everyone from the police treated me with dignity and respect (as much as they could). The guys who took my prints even made me a cuppa which was very welcome and we had a chat.

As I was being formally charged and released I even had a laugh about football with the desk (they all supported one side of a county line, I was from the other side of the county line). Oddly enough I said "thank you" as they let me go. The officer who let me out the door smirked and said, "you don't need to say thank you, not many people do that here". I felt it was important to say that even though I was guilty I was shocked at how well I was treated.....it was p!ssing it down outside after as well, and they offered to get me a jumper of some sort or maybe a lift. I declined both as I just wanted to get the hell out of there.

Anyhow, after all that waffle and as I eluded above...your experience sounds horrendous and probably not something you want to experience again (even for 10 hours).
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
Luna

I am really sorry to hear about your experience in police custody. Under the Police & Criminal Evidence Act 1984, Custody Sergeants can only detain people for a maximum of up to 24 hours before they either charge or release you.

Once charged, custody sergeant's can technically 'remand' prisoners in police custody to appear before the next available court session. If you are charged at lunchtime on a Saturday and the sergeant refuses bail, you can invariably spend just shy of 48 hours in police custody until you are taken to the Magistrates Court on Monday morning.

On reflection, maybe I was fortunate - I was arrested late afternoon for DUI. Because the coppers hadn't witness me drive, I had to be interviewed. As I was well oiled, they cannot interview people until they have sobered up, so I wasn't interviewed until the following morning in custody.

I coughed on interview and was swiftly charged and released just before lunchtime. I believe I was in police custody for around 19-20 hours in total. It isn't an experience I would like to relive again. The worst part was 'drying' out from a five day alcohol binge. They did get the custody nurse to check me over, but I was in a right old state and I was climbing the walls in my cell because the anxiety and withdrawal was kicking in.

When I took part in my drink drive reduction course, I heard some right horror stories of how people were treated by the police - and in my view the people on my course were all decent folk who had never been in trouble previously with the coppers.

CJ
My offence was in Scotland and I was told that the Lord Advocate for Scotland had 'decreed' that anyone with my level of alcohol (124) was to be kept in custody and taken to the next available court hearing which was on Monday.

To be honest I was more concerned about the effect of my actions on my family than the impact on me of being locked up for so long. It was simply tedious and boring. Luckily I had no real withdrawal effects although by that time I was a top up drunk so that was a surprise.

The biggest grips was that they did not call and let my family know I had been arrested and was being kept in custody. They didn't find out until much later on the Friday and only because my son asked a policeman he saw in the street who contacted the station and was told what had happened.

It was an experience. One I said I would never repeat but 2 years later I did it again although was only held for around 8 hours before being released.

I am now 2.5 years sober and surprisingly the family and friends have stood by me.

The thing that gets me about police custody is that everyone is treated exactly the same. In theory you are all innocent until convicted yet I was still held for well over 56 hours with no visits and no access to hygiene facilities.

The station I was relocated to seemed to be one of the main holding stations for the area and the noise was incredible, especially from the spice users.
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
That sounds an awful experience Luna2000.

The cell door closed on me at about 0400 Sunday morning after blowing 76 and I did around 10 hours in custody. I was coherent throughout and slept for a couple of hours on the slab of concrete with that thin mattress and blanket. When they unlocked the door at maybe around 0930 to take me to have my prints and picture taken it was actually a relief just to not be in that small cold blank room.

When they took me back to the cell and the guy said it "shouldn't be much longer" before I am released, in the whole scheme of things he was right I suppose, but I remember pacing up and down and starting to feel claustrophobic, anxious etc etc. Those last 2 or 3 hours were terrible, so having to do Friday through to Sunday like you did...... you have my sympathy as I'm not sure how I would of dealt with that and I am generally speaking a pretty strong willed bloke.

Don't get me wrong, I was over the limit, guilty, so was in a process, but that short period was horrible. I have to say though all things considered everyone from the police treated me with dignity and respect (as much as they could). The guys who took my prints even made me a cuppa which was very welcome and we had a chat.

As I was being formally charged and released I even had a laugh about football with the desk (they all supported one side of a county line, I was from the other side of the county line). Oddly enough I said "thank you" as they let me go. The officer who let me out the door smirked and said, "you don't need to say thank you, not many people do that here". I felt it was important to say that even though I was guilty I was shocked at how well I was treated.....it was p!ssing it down outside after as well, and they offered to get me a jumper of some sort or maybe a lift. I declined both as I just wanted to get the hell out of there.

Anyhow, after all that waffle and as I eluded above...your experience sounds horrendous and probably not something you want to experience again (even for 10 hours).
My offence was in Scotland and I was told that the Lord Advocate for Scotland had 'decreed' that anyone with my level of alcohol (124) was to be kept in custody and taken to the next available court hearing which was on Monday.

To be honest I was more concerned about the effect of my actions on my family than the impact on me of being locked up for so long. It was simply tedious and boring. Luckily I had no real withdrawal effects although by that time I was a top up drunk so that was a surprise.

The biggest grips was that they did not call and let my family know I had been arrested and was being kept in custody. They didn't find out until much later on the Friday and only because my son asked a policeman he saw in the street who contacted the station and was told what had happened.

It was an experience. One I said I would never repeat but 2 years later I did it again although was only held for around 8 hours before being released.

I am now 2.5 years sober and surprisingly the family and friends have stood by me.

The thing that gets me about police custody is that everyone is treated exactly the same. In theory you are all innocent until convicted yet I was still held for well over 56 hours with no visits and no access to hygiene facilities.

The station I was relocated to seemed to be one of the main holding stations for the area and the noise was incredible, especially from the spice users.
 

Gilln1

Well-known member
My offence was in Scotland and I was told that the Lord Advocate for Scotland had 'decreed' that anyone with my level of alcohol (124) was to be kept in custody and taken to the next available court hearing which was on Monday.

To be honest I was more concerned about the effect of my actions on my family than the impact on me of being locked up for so long. It was simply tedious and boring. Luckily I had no real withdrawal effects although by that time I was a top up drunk so that was a surprise.

The biggest grips was that they did not call and let my family know I had been arrested and was being kept in custody. They didn't find out until much later on the Friday and only because my son asked a policeman he saw in the street who contacted the station and was told what had happened.

It was an experience. One I said I would never repeat but 2 years later I did it again although was only held for around 8 hours before being released.

I am now 2.5 years sober and surprisingly the family and friends have stood by me.

The thing that gets me about police custody is that everyone is treated exactly the same. In theory you are all innocent until convicted yet I was still held for well over 56 hours with no visits and no access to hygiene facilities.

The station I was relocated to seemed to be one of the main holding stations for the area and the noise was incredible, especially from the spice users.

2.5 years sober...good for you.

If that was a battle then it is one you should genuinely pat yourself on the back for an be proud of regardless of the driving.

Its true what you say about police custody everyone is treated the same, and when I reflect on it, of course we are. At 0330 (ish) when I first stepped in the station I'm just another case number I suppose, and there aren't cells for the naughty one's, and worse cell's for the really bad one's....there are cells.

In some respects now I look back, the ban (7 months still to go ) and fine I can deal with, I was petrified at the time (which is why, like many people I am here) but those locked up hours still toy with my mind even now. I don't want to do that again !
 

Luna2000

Well-known member
2.5 years sober...good for you.

If that was a battle then it is one you should genuinely pat yourself on the back for an be proud of regardless of the driving.

Its true what you say about police custody everyone is treated the same, and when I reflect on it, of course we are. At 0330 (ish) when I first stepped in the station I'm just another case number I suppose, and there aren't cells for the naughty one's, and worse cell's for the really bad one's....there are cells.

In some respects now I look back, the ban (7 months still to go ) and fine I can deal with, I was petrified at the time (which is why, like many people I am here) but those locked up hours still toy with my mind even now. I don't want to do that again !
I wasn't so much scared of the Police process because as I said I had a lot of professional knowledge of prisons and how they operate. In fact, I was slightly detached at times, assessing what was going on, asking questions etc.

I was scared of the reaction I would get when I got home.

3 days to dwell on that? Not fun.
 

jamesbrown1

Well-known member
I wasn't so much scared of the Police process because as I said I had a lot of professional knowledge of prisons and how they operate. In fact, I was slightly detached at times, assessing what was going on, asking questions etc.

I was scared of the reaction I would get when I got home.

3 days to dwell on that? Not fun.
blimey - these accounts sound almost dystopian. I had a very different experience, was locked up around 2 am after a slightly (I thought), bizarre chat with the arresting officers, one of whom was contemplating buying the same car as mine and asked if i recommended them. I was given multiple coffees throughout the night, when requested and a really pleasant breakfast, they then released me at about 8 am and actually apologised they didn't have the available man-power to give me a lift back to my car. All in all I have to say the police themselves and the staff were all very pleasant in the circumstances. Still, have zero ambition to repeat it.
 

Polly3

Well-known member
blimey - these accounts sound almost dystopian. I had a very different experience, was locked up around 2 am after a slightly (I thought), bizarre chat with the arresting officers, one of whom was contemplating buying the same car as mine and asked if i recommended them. I was given multiple coffees throughout the night, when requested and a really pleasant breakfast, they then released me at about 8 am and actually apologised they didn't have the available man-power to give me a lift back to my car. All in all I have to say the police themselves and the staff were all very pleasant in the circumstances. Still, have zero ambition to repeat it.
I wonder if the arresting officer thought you might be wanting to sell your car once you’d been disqualified ? 😂 Sorry: I know that is frivolous but your post has entertained me . I wasn’t sober enough to have a conversation : a shameful performance on my part .
 

jamesbrown1

Well-known member
I wonder if the arresting officer thought you might be wanting to sell your car once you’d been disqualified ? 😂 Sorry: I know that is frivolous but your post has entertained me . I wasn’t sober enough to have a conversation : a shameful performance on my part .
all makes sense now!!! B*stard!! :ROFLMAO:, he also said "you're driving was fine mate, just a tad fast for the road" - clearly softening me up for a low bid on my car!
 

firemansam007

Well-known member
all makes sense now!!! B*stard!! :ROFLMAO:, he also said "you're driving was fine mate, just a tad fast for the road" - clearly softening me up for a low bid on my car!
Dear all,

Apologies for reopening the thread.
I have a question regarding my friend's recent conviction.

He was disqualified for 3 years plus 8 weeks in prison for driving while disqualified and drink driving. This was his 3rd offence in 10 years.

He was banned for 3 years for second offence which ends on July 23. He was further banned in Nov-21 for another 3 years for driving while disqualified and drink driving (breath reading 152 very high).

My question is whether his disqualification which was given in Nov'21 would run concurrently or it will only start after the disqualification for the second offence (ends Jul-23)

DVLA gov.uk website shows his second disqualification, not the one issued in Nov-2021. hence the confusion.

Thanks,

Sam
 
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